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Air Plant Snow Globes

Posted on November 1, 2016 in House + Home, All Videos, Holiday Ideas, Indoor & Tropical Plant Care, Making Terrariums

Written by West Coast Gardens

Is it snowing yet? Seems like the season hasn’t quite arrived until there’s snow on the ground. But some years you have to make your own white Christmas! Our trio of Air Plant Snow Globes is just the thing to add a festive dusting of snow to your home. Easy to make, you simply add in the “snow”, position your Tillandsia and ornaments, then enjoy the view!

Home cultivation is simple; mist the plants every second day in the spring and summer, and every three to four days in winter.  The plant should dry out within two-hours of being misted.  If the foliage remains wet for longer than two-hours, consider removing the plant and misting it outside of the vessel.  

The foliage of air plants is covered with trichomes; tiny hairs on the outer layer of foliage that absorbs moisture and nutrients.  If these trichomes dry out too much, you are left with an air plant-skeleton.  If you over-saturate the trichomes, they become limp and can rot off.  The key is finding the balance. 

Air plants are a huge and handsome family of nearly 750 different species, plus hybrids, so you have plenty of options when shopping for them. Some air plants are circular and small, some are curly and grow like lichen (called “Spanish Moss”), others are rigid and could poke your eye out, and some are smooth and sessile. 

More bonuses: all air plants flower!  There’s no need to look for one that has a flower forming, as yours will bloom at some point while in your care.  Some are even fragrant.  When they are about to flower, they will naturally “blush,” transforming from their greenish-grey colour to a pinkish hue.  Eventually their purple and yellow tubular flowers will emerge from the flower spike; a totally-tropical winning combination.  Most only bloom for a day or so, so it’s not truly the flower that we’re infatuated with, it’s the foliage.